(Standard spoiler disclaimer applies to The Quick and the Dead.  Also, this page has several images and large GIFs, so you might want to give it a minute to load before proceeding.)

WI love me some dialogue.  There’s nothing quite like a good snappy exchange, and great quotes are the kind of thing that becomes timelessly viral (as evidenced by the average quantity of Monty Python quotes in a given D&D session).  But dialogue isn’t everything, and there’s a whole lot you can do without ever saying a word.

As befits a story about a stoic badass riding into a town full of stoic badasses, The Quick and the Dead is practically a master class on this topic, packed with just about every kind of visual communication you can imagine.

Here’s one silent exchange from very early on, when the Lady first arrives in Redemption:

lady

The creepy mustached guy, Eugene Dred, will be her secondary antagonist, right behind Herod.  Notice the way she shows him her gun, and his reaction?  Their enmity gets set up immediately, in just under 15 seconds.

Another similar exchange of glances establishes Herod’s primary challengers (Ed. note: This GIF cuts out a couple of shots in the middle):

saloon

In both cases, pretty much all it takes to set up these relationships is eye contact.  There are a whole lot of characters in play and not a lot of time to set everything up, so this method efficiently builds audience expectations, so we already know what’s going down even before individual beefs get explained.

Efficiency occasionally leads us to an entirely wordless scene.  The Lady meets with Cort to work out the rather complicated conspiracy that will see her fake her death and blow up half the town, but we naturally don’t see that whole discussion.  All we see of it is this:

chat

Of course, it’s not a silent film, and there’s quite a bit of dialogue.  But the visuals still don’t slouch, frequently providing crucial subtext:

qatd

The barkeep is talking about the food and drink Herod is paying for.  Later on, Dred will rape the girl, and the Lady will kill him for it.

And, of course, there’s the trailer-friendly, not terribly subtle but still rather awesome:

deserve to die

The movie is thick with background details, too.  I’ll spare you examples of the gun porn (every fighter carries a unique, frequently blinged-out and customized, weapon) because this page would be about eighty screens long.  But look over the Lady’s shoulder in the saloon for a wanted poster for one of the other contestants:

background poster

Or the skulls and bones that are all the hell over that scene:

skeleton

skulls

skull

The saloon scene is a good example of how the film divides its focus well among its large ensemble cast, and they’re frequently worth watching in the background throughout.  For instance, you can spot every character who makes it past the first round as they watch the first duel:

Here’s Foy’s priceless reaction to the glass of water that almost hit him in the face:

foy

Or watch Cort’s hands twitch after he’s held a gun for the first time in years:

shop

Those little details help keep the character present and active, even while the lines are going to other people.


Okay, so that’s an awful lot of examples, and admittedly, things like subtle acting choices or set dressing aren’t really major tools in your arsenal as a fiction writer.  Still, there are a few things that can be drawn from this for writers in any medium:

  • Don’t forget who’s in your scene.  If a character is there, they’re going to have a reaction, even if they don’t have any direct involvement.
  • Well-chosen details in the setting can reveal a lot.  For instance, describing in prose everything happening in the densely-packed saloon scene would take dozens of pages, but it would be easy enough to include the skeletons.
  • Don’t be afraid to pare down.  If you can establish something with just an exchange of glances or a gesture, maybe you should, especially if it helps build the tension.
  • Remember your other senses!  Though we’ve mainly discussed visuals here, the click of a gun and the thunk of the clock are omnipresent throughout the film.

In short, make sure you’re making the most of all the ways people communicate and interact.  There’s a lot more to it than just words.

%d bloggers like this: