(Standard spoiler disclaimer applies to Finding Nemo and John Carter.)

RThis one isn’t so much “original analysis” as “Brittany watches directors’ commentary so you don’t have to,” but it’s still a good lesson for writers to learn (especially because the filmmaker seemed to forget it later).

In early drafts of Finding Nemo, the story started with Marlin taking Nemo to school for the first time, and the opening scene played out essentially the same as in the finished film, with Marlin being overprotective and neurotic.  As the film went on, the tragedy in Marlin’s past would be hinted at through snippets of flashbacks until a late reveal of the full version of how he lost his family.

What the filmmakers realized was that, without knowing what he’d been through, Marlin came off as obnoxious, whiny, and unlikable.  You could sympathize with the loss of his son, but he was still a pain in the ass that you didn’t want to spend ninety minutes with.  Further, they realized that there wasn’t even any dramatic benefit to withholding the information.  It was readily apparent that something bad had happened without even flashing back, and pretty much as soon as you showed Coral, the audience got the gist and the specific details didn’t make a difference.  It was a reveal for the sake of a reveal, so it was scrapped in favor of a straightforward prologue scene.

“But wait!” I hear you saying.  “Agents hate prologues, don’t they?”  If we’re talking novels, yes they do, and for good reason.  I talk about different media a bit interchangeably around here, because to a certain extent, story is story and the lessons carry over.  However, fiction has certain tools at its disposal, like narration and internal monologue, which film tends to use rarely because they’re awkward as hell in a primarily visual medium.  So while a novel version of the story could use a little authorial intrusion to let us know in a couple of sentences that Nemo is the sole survivor of a predator that killed the rest of Marlin’s family, the simplest way to convey this information in a movie is just to show it.

To get an idea of how the original plan would have played out, you need look no further than another film by the same director, Andrew Stanton.

It’s not that John Carter lacks for prologues, oh no.  First, we get one showing how Pretty Much Always Evil Mark Strong gives Pretty Much Always Asshole Dominic West the secret magic weapon thing.  Then there’s the framing device of Burroughs getting filled in on the peculiar circumstances of his uncle’s death.  Then after that there’s the setup with Carter searching for gold.  When the Army tries to pressgang him back into service, we get this bit:

CARTER: Colonel Powell, sir, whatever it is you suppose I owe you, our country, or any other beloved cause, I have already paid it.

(Meaningful closeup of Carter’s hand, where he wears a man’s and a woman’s wedding bands)

CARTER: I have paid in full, sir.

It’s quite an elegant bit of exposition, really.  With that one image, we get an illuminating glimpse of Carter’s past, which helps us understand his desire to be left alone.

But Stanton doesn’t think we’ve gotten the message, because the next hour is scattered with flashbacks to Carter’s tragically pretty family, until the midpoint, where it’s “revealed” as some sort of big climax.  The argument could be made that the specific details of their fate do matter: it’s not just that they died, but that they died while he was fighting someone else’s war, and that’s why he tries so desperately to stay out of things.

But really, that’s the same problem as with Marlin, isn’t it?  Without understanding that detail, Carter looks like kind of a dick for persisting in his refusal to help people he clearly seems to like.  By the time you really see where the character arc starts, he’s already most of the way along it, so the whole thing loses quite a lot of its effectiveness.

The reveal is a useful tool, one that can elevate a story into something exciting and memorable.  But it is not intrinsically valuable and it is not an absolute good.  It’s okay if the details about a person’s past aren’t shocking game changers, but if they’re not, perhaps it’s better not to pretend they are.

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