(Standard spoiler disclaimer applies to The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, book flavor.)

OConsidering how haphazard my planning for the month has been (M’s post was written way back in January, while this one is coming to you from the far-distant land of two days ago), it’s a bit funny how thing seem to be lining up.  Yesterday’s post talked about how writing in first-person can present certain problems.  But going in the opposite direction isn’t guaranteed smooth sailing, either.

“Head-hopping” has gotten to be something of a bad word in the reading world.  It refers to a third-person omniscient view that doesn’t constrain itself to a single viewpoint character, but dips freely into whichever thoughts and reactions might be relevant.  This can get kind of confusing, especially if a reader missed the part where the POV changed, or if a character’s direct thoughts are thrown in without sufficient attribution.  Current conventional wisdom seems to favor a sort of revolving limited perspective than an omniscient one, only changing viewpoints with a scene or chapter break.  Of course, if you’re cutting quickly enough that you end up with scenes shorter than a page, it can feel just as disjointed, if not more so.  (See the latter half of The Good Fairies of New York for a good example of that.)

However, it is possible to execute this technique well, because really, it’s possible to execute any technique well.  For today’s master class, let’s turn to the late, great Douglas Adams.

One of the biggest difficulties for the omniscient perspective is voice, that tricky bastard that everyone looks for but no one can quite describe.  With a close third-person, the narrator’s voice will echo that of the viewpoint character, and not just by directly relaying their thoughts.  (For a fantastic example of this, check out Gail Carriger’s Soulless.)  With an omniscient perspective, if the narrator tries to echo each of the many viewpoint characters, things can get very muddled, but if they echo none at all, it’s just sterile.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, on the other hand, maintains one distinctive voice throughout: the voice of the Guide.  The actual guide entries are set apart in italics (at least in the editions I’ve got), but that same sardonic, matter-of-fact tone carries through into the scenes with the main characters, as well as the tangential world-building asides.  No matter how random and disconnected the topic, that consistent style helps keep the reader anchored and minimizes confusion.

The other thing that helps prevent confusion is that every single head-hop is clearly attributed.  There are no interjections that come out of nowhere; the declarative style means that we pretty much always start by identifying the character.

Consider this passage:

Trillian couldn’t sleep.  She sat on a couch and stared at a small cage which contained her last and only links with Earth–two white mice that she had insisted Zaphod let her bring.  She had expected never to see the planet again, but she was disturbed by her negative reaction to the news of the planet’s destruction.  It seemed remote and unreal and she could find no thoughts to think about it.  She watched the mice scurrying round the cage and running furiously in their little plastic treadwheels till they occupied her whole attention.  Suddenly she shook herself and went back on to the bridge to watch over the tiny flashing lights and figures that charted the ship’s progress through the void.  She wished she knew what it was she was trying not to think about.

 

Zaphod couldn’t sleep.  He also wished he knew what it was that he wouldn’t let himself think about.  For as long as he could remember he’d suffered from a vague nagging feeling of being not all there.  Most of the time he was able to put this thought aside and not worry about it, but it had been reawakened by the sudden, inexplicable arrival of Ford Prefect and Arthur Dent.  Somehow it seemed to conform to a pattern that he couldn’t see.

 

Ford couldn’t sleep.  He was too excited about being back on the road again.  Fifteen years of virtual imprisonment were over, just as he was finally beginning to give up hope.  Knocking about with Zaphod for a bit promised to be a lot of fun, though there seemed to be something faintly odd about his semicousin that he couldn’t put his finger on.  The fact that he had become President of the Galaxy was frankly astonishing, as was the manner of his leaving the post.  Was there a reason behind it?  There would be no point in asking Zaphod, he never appeared to have a reason for anything he did at all: he had turned unfathomability into an art form.  He attacked everything in life with a mixture of extraordinary genius and naive incompetence and it was often difficult to tell which was which.

 

Arthur slept: he was terribly tired.

Scene breaks would be far too jagged, but we do get paragraph breaks, and each switch starts by identifying the character so we know exactly where we stand.  There are little hints of specific personalities (like the difference between “she could find no thoughts to think about it” and “knocking about with Zaphod”) but the overall tone remains consistent.  And, naturally, it ends with a punchline.

This, of course, isn’t the only way to pull off this technique, but it’s a good example because it so specifically addresses the elements that can trip up readers.  The omniscient narrator may know all, but they have to be able to get it across in a way that isn’t confusing.

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