(Standard spoiler disclaimer applies to Dragonhaven.)

NOne of the very first things we have to decide in writing fiction is the identity of the narrator.  First or third?  Multiple narrators?  Limited or omniscient?  True, this is something that can change a lot while writing, but you’ve got to make a decision in order to start stringing words together at all.  The choice of narrator affects, and is affected by, a host of factors: genre and category expectations, which characters are privy to what events and knowledge, series considerations, thematic goals, and so on.  But what happens when these factors point in different directions?

Robin McKinley’s Dragonhaven, the story of a young boy who illegally raises an orphaned dragon, is written in first person, narrated by Jake.  On the face of it, first person seems like the rather obvious choice.  The conceit is that this is a memoir documenting an event that is famous in Jake’s world, while in our world, the intimate and confessional nature of first person lends itself very well to YA.

But the problem is twofold.  First, Jake’s narration is something of an unfiltered internal monologue, a huge departure from Robin McKinley’s usual lyrical style that was off-putting to many readers.  Secondly, Jake isn’t around for some pretty major plot events, most notably, well, the entire climax.  Seriously, he’s holed up with his dragons while the rest of the staff of the park holds off the National bloody Guard.  He’s told how it all went down afterward, and the explanation that “we” (being the readers of the memoir in his world, not the readers of the novel in ours) should have all heard about it on the news is cute, but still makes the whole thing rather unsatisfying.

So does this mean it should have been written differently?  Well, no.  It’s all about priorities.  This is primarily a Boy and His Dog type story, with the focus being on how a teenage boy copes with the stresses and joys of motherhood (and yes, he’s rather specific about it being motherhood) taken to fantastic extremes.  Taking it out of Jake’s immediate perspective would have been a very different story, and whether “different” means “better” is highly subjective.

Still, it’s important to weigh all these factors in when you’re making these decisions in your own work.  You needn’t be a slave to your author “brand” and stick exclusively to an established style and theme, but it’s still wise to be aware of what expectations your readers are bringing to the table.  If you’re limiting the perspective, can you still establish the necessary events?  If you’re going wide, can you still get us close to your characters?  Sometimes the identity of the best narrator will jump out and beat you over the head, but frequently you’ll have to make trade-offs and weigh the pros and cons, maybe even try out several options in different drafts.  Though the peanut gallery is always going to have our opinions on how well it worked, in the end, only you know what’s going to best serve the story you want to tell.

%d bloggers like this: