(Standard spoiler disclaimer applies to The Avengers.)

KLast time we talked a bit about common soundbites of writing advice that run the risk of being smurfed into meaninglessness.  Let’s continue on in that vein, shall we?  Today’s frequently used, frequently misunderstood phrase is “Kill your darlings.”

Unlike phrases such as “show, don’t tell” or “strong female character,” the problem here isn’t that people are using the same term to discuss similar-but-not-identical concepts.  This one is pretty straightforward: No matter how much you like a sentence/paragraph/scene/character/subplot/waheyhey, if it’s causing other issues in the story, it probably needs to be changed or removed.  It’s about keeping the big picture in mind and steeling yourself for tough editorial decisions.  It is not about liking a sentence/paragraph/scene/character/subplot/waheyhey so much that you suspect something might be wrong with it, and it is not about cutting material for the sake of cutting material.

So, as is my wont, let’s see this one in action.

Remember the blonde waitress who’s so prominently featured in the third act of The Avengers (and in the image at the top of this page)?  She definitely set my English major spidey senses tingling, and I figured that she was going to be a recurring character, perhaps a love interest for Cap.  She didn’t show up in Winter Soldier, so perhaps there was a scheduling conflict, they decided to take it in a different direction, or they just plain forgot that they’d set her up.  (The latter is what I’m pretty sure happened to most of the events of The Incredible Hulk, as a side note.)  But as it turns out, her bigger role was in The Avengers itself, but most of it ended up on the cutting room floor.

Here she is meeting Steve in the first act:

And they filmed quite a bit of footage with her for the climactic battle sequence:

None of this footage is bad, and some of it clearly made it pretty far in the process: multiple angles are edited together, and there’s score and even preliminary special effects in some places.  The first scene gives Cap’s character some additional depth (and shows off his art skills!), and the second gives us a recognizable face to represent the bystanders and remind us all of what’s at stake.  It’s not purely extraneous, so why isn’t it in there?

Well, it’s already a pretty dense movie, and you can’t have everything.  Cap’s extended introduction kind of kills the pacing of the “getting the gang together” portion of the movie, and there’s just not time to explore his individual arc here.  It’s an ensemble film, so they take advantage of having all the characters in one place to show how they interact.  Specifically with Steve, the focus is on his relationship with Tony, which is going to be a hugely important part of Civil War.  His solo story about adjusting to the modern world gets shifted over to his solo movie, where it’s a better fit.

As for why the second batch of scenes got cut?  I don’t know if you guys noticed this, but the Battle of New York is fucking long.  It’s thirty-four goddamn minutes from when Iron Man first arrives to when Loki asks for his drink.  Just keeping track of all our heroes as they kick ass takes quite enough, let alone following around some random chick as she just tries not to get killed.  She’s given just enough screentime that we recognize her when she gives her interview at the end, but more than that would just bog down a sequence that’s already pushing its luck.

The filmmaking process is extremely segmented when it comes time to the actual filming: scenes are shot out of order by a crew that frequently hasn’t read any of the script, and rewrites are usually happening continually.  It’s pretty much impossible to get a feel for what the actual movie is going to look like until you get to the editing room and can take a more holistic look.  Even if you’re writing fiction and working from start to finish, it can be hard from the trenches to have any concept of the work as a whole.  That’s why revision is so vital, but it means that you’ll often have ideas you’ve put a lot of work into that end up getting nixed.  “Kill your darlings” just tells you to suck it up and do what needs to be done.  On the plus side, technology–DVD extras, YouTube, author websites, social media, and so on–gives you an alternate way to showcase those ideas without bogging down the story, so at least your darlings don’t have to die unmourned.

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